What Is The Difference Between Garmin Striker And Echomap?

UPDATED 29 JANUARY 2021

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by Robert Ceran

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Garmin produces some of the finest fish finder electronics on the market, and two or their most popular lineups are the Striker and Echomap series.

However, the problem with these fish finder series is that they come in a bewildering array of models, variations, and sizes. Because of this, it’s very difficult to determine which model has exactly all the features that you need for your purpose.

In this article we compare the Striker Plus series (which has replaced the Striker series) with the Echomap series side by side, so you can compare their most important features at a glance, to help decide which model is best for your purpose.

 

Garmin Striker vs Echomap series compared side by side

ModelImagePriceDisplay sizePreloaded mapsMicroSDWiFiCHIRPSideVuGPS
Garmin Striker Plus 44.3″NoneNoNoNoNoYes
Garmin Echomap Plus 45CV4.3″NoneYesNoYesNoYes
Garmin Striker Plus 7CV7″NoneNoYesYesNoYes
Garmin Echomap UHD 73CV7″LakeVu G3YesYesYesNoYes
Garmin Striker Plus 7SV7″NoneNoYesYesYesYes
Garmin Echomap UHD 73SV7″LakeVu G3YesYesYesYesYes

 

The table above compares the most important specifications of Striker Plus models with Echomap models of comparable size and sonar capability. 

As you can see, you really have to look at the details in order to understand the differences between the two lineups, and also between specific models.

Let’s look at the main differences between the Striker Plus and Echomap UHD lineups in more detail.

The most important differences between the Striker Plus and Echomap series discussed

Preloaded maps: This is the first area with very big differences between the two series. None of the models in the Striker Plus series comes with preloaded maps. Since none of them have a microSD card slot either, this means you can’t load any maps on to them.

In contrast to this, the Echomap UHD 73CV and 73SV models come with LakeVu HD maps preloaded. The Echomap Plus 45CV, however, does not come with preloaded maps. But since all Echomap units have a microSD card slot, you can load maps onto to them that way.

Bottom line: None of the Striker Plus models have preloaded maps, nor a microSD slot to add them, which means you can only use them as pure fish finders, without any real mapping functionality. In contrast, Echomap models come with preloaded maps (except for the smallest models), and all of them have a microSD card slot to load additional maps, which means you can use them both as fish finders and for mapping.

MicroSD card slot: As already mentioned above, this is another area with major differences between the two series. None of the Striker Plus models have a microSD card slot, while all Echomap models do. This underscores the intention of the manufacturers for the Striker Plus series to be used as pure fish finders, while the Echomap series combines fish finder functionality with state of the art mapping capability. 

Wi-Fi: The larger models of both series have wi-fi functionality, while the smaller models don’t. 

CHIRP sonar: There is no real difference between the two series in this regard, as almost all models have CHIRP sonar (except for the Striker Plus 4). CHIRP has become a basic feature of most Garmin fish finders nowadays, which is great, since it translates into higher quality sonar imaging.

ClearVu: This is Garmin’s version of down imaging, and is a basic feature included in all models of both series.

SideVu: This is Garmin’s version of side imaging, and is only included on the high end models in both series (the Striker Plus 7SV and the Echomap UHD 73SV). The differences here are not between the two lineups, but rather between the high end and low end models in each lineup.

GPS: This is included as a basic feature in all models of both series. It should be noted that although the Striker Plus series doesn’t include any real mapping capabilities, you can place GPS waypoints, and use your sonar data to create your own maps with Quickdraw.

Display size: There is no difference between the two series in this regard.

Screen resolution: There is no difference between the two lineups in this category.

Now let’s look at each of the models in more detail.

 

Garmin Striker Plus 4

This is the smallest Striker Plus model, and is a great size for kayak fishing, or for use as a portable fish finder. This is definitely also the cheapest model, and provides very solid sonar functionality at an affordable price. However, you should note that it doesn’t have CHIRP – only traditional 2D sonar.

Features:

  • Display size: 4.3” diagonal
  • Screen resolution: 480 x 270
  • Transducer: dual beam
  • Frequencies: 77/220 kHz

 

Garmin Echomap Plus 45CV

This is the smallest Echomap model, and is similar in size to the Striker Plus 4. But it also includes CHIRP and ClearVu down imaging, which translates into a huge improvement in terms of sonar capabilities. It also comes with a microSD slot. However, with its relatively small size, it’s not really useful for complex mapping, which is probably why Garmin doesn’t include preloaded maps. 

So if you’re really keen on the mapping functionality, it’s better to get one of the larger Echomap models.

Features:

  • Display size: 4.3” diagonal
  • Screen resolution: 480 x 270
  • Transducer: dual beam
  • Frequencies: 50/77/83/220 kHz

 

Garmin Striker Plus 7CV

This model has a generous screen size of 7 inches, and comes at an excellent price point compared to the value it packs. It comes with CHIRP and 2D sonar, but doesn’t include SideVu side scanning functionality. If you want this feature, you need to get the 7SV model instead.

Features:

  • Display size: 7” diagonal
  • Screen resolution: 800 x 480
  • Sonar technologies: ClearVu, CHIRP
  • Wi-Fi connectivity: yes

 

Garmin Echomap UHD 73CV

The UHD 73CV comes preloaded with LakeVu HD G3 maps, and combined with its large 7 inch screen size, this means you can use the split screen functionality to combine sonar read outs with mapping navigation. Many anglers want to use preloaded maps in addition to fish finder functionality, and this model provides these functions at a great price.

Features:

  • Display size: 7” diagonal
  • Screen resolution: 800 x 480
  • Preloaded charts: LakeVu G3
  • Sonar technologies: ClearVu, CHIRP

 

Garmin Striker Plus 7SV

This is the flagship model in the Striker Plus series, and comes with some of the most cutting edge sonar technologies produced by Garmin, including SideVu side scan functionality. Side scan imaging can be extremely useful to cover large areas to find promising spots to zoom in on, which helps to catch a lot more fish.

While the Striker Plus 7SV can’t be used for mapping, it does provide some of the finest fish finder sonar technology currently on the market at less than $500.

Features:

  • Display size: 7” diagonal
  • Screen resolution: 800 x 480
  • Transducer: CV52HW-TM
  • Wi-Fi connectivity: yes

 

Garmin Echomap UHD 73SV

Just like the Striker Plus 7SV, this model also includes SideVu side scan sonar, and thus it combines the cutting edge sonar capabilities of the 7SV with high end mapping functionality. That means you can use preloaded maps to navigate to the most promising spots right away, and then scan those spots with the full array of SideVu, ClearVu, and CHIRP. Obviously, this gives you the edge when it comes to finding fish, especially on large bodies of water that you aren’t familiar with.

Features:

  • Display size: 7” diagonal
  • Screen resolution: 800 x 480
  • Preloaded charts: LakeVu G3
  • Sonar technologies: SideVu, ClearVu, CHIRP

 

Conclusion

To summarize: the Striker Plus series provides state of the art Garmin sonar functionalities, but without the ability to use preloaded maps. The Echomap series includes all the sonar functionalities of the Striker Plus series, but in addition it also provides the ability to use preloaded maps for navigation. This is especially useful on the larger models with split screen functionality.

The Echomap series is compatible with Lakemaster maps, which means you can load their highly detailed lake maps on to your fish finder (for more details on this, check out our article Navionics vs Lakemaster – what are the pros and cons).

Also, if you’re interested to check out a Lowrance model that combines both high end sonar plus mapping functionality, take a loot at our Lowrance Elite 9 TI review.

 

Additional resources:

Robert Ceran

Robert Ceran

Robert grew up fishing for crappie and bluegill as a young boy, and later graduated to the pursuit of bigger game. He loves participating at bass tournaments all over the country, whenever he’s not on one of his fly fishing trips to Canada. Robert started writing when he was just 17, and is now our chief wordsmith at Sport Fishing Buddy.

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